Were a property is provided as rented accommodation an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) must be provided to the proposed tenant and the rating should not be lower than “E”.

The certificate, issued by one of our accredited assessors, provides information about the property’s energy use and typical energy costs as well as giving recommendation(s) for energy use reduction.

We offer a fast turnaround Energy Performance Certificates so you can put your property on the sale or rental market quickly. Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) assessments are generally carried out within 3 working days of instruction.

  • The certificates can only be provided by an accredited energy assessor.
  • Predicted Energy Assessments as required under the Building Regulations (A, D, L) can be provided to show that the proposed building will achieve the required energy efficiency.

Frequently Asked Questions

An EPC demonstrates the energy efficiency of a dwelling at the completion of construction. Furthermore when constructing a new dwelling, energy calculations are required in order to demonstrate compliance with the Building Regulations. The Government also utilises these calculations to fulfil its energy reduction mandates to the European Union. Before issuing an EPC for a property it is required that a Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) calculation is performed on the property.
The Building Regulations, Part L in Eng & Wales and Part F in Northern Ireland, aim to ensure minimum standards are adhered to whenever new dwellings are constructed. The prescribed method for demonstrating that minimum standards have been achieved with regards to the energy efficiency requirements is to perform a (SAP) calculation on the property.
The energy assessment procedure for an existing dwelling is somewhat simpler than that required for a new build and the calculation method is referred to as an rdSAP. To summarise:
  • You need a SAP (or rdSAP) calculation to gain an EPC
  • You need an EPC to rent, sell or ‘sign off’ a dwelling
All new buildings should have an ‘as designed’ energy assessment undertaken before actual commencement of building takes place. These energy assessments produce a Predicted Energy Assessment (PEA) report. Such a report can be used by the client, architect and builder to aid discussion about improving energy efficiency and eliminating potential problems. For ‘new builds’ it is extremely important to understand the issues of domestic EPC compliance at the design stage. Once the building has been completed we will undertake a final survey and produce an EPC.
An EPC applies to the overall dwelling, hence adding an extension does not necessarily require a separate EPC however you may need to have an energy assessment to demonstrate compliance with the Building Regulations. This type of assessments is often referred to as a comparative SAP (compSAP).

Any building which is not a domestic dwelling is considered to be a commercial building and will require an EPC if it is rented or sold. There are a few exemptions, such as places of worship, buildings scheduled for demolition or temporary buildings.

Anyone involved with a commercial property should seek expert advice as to whether they need a EPC or not, as failure to comply can cause stringent penalties.

There is a considerable difference in the procedures for gaining an EPC on a domestic dwelling as opposed to a commercial property. Dwellings have to be assessed by a qualified Domestic Energy Assessor (DEA) whereas Commercial Buildings require a Non-Domestic Energy Assessor (NDEA). In the Commercial sector properties are classified by different Levels which are based on factors about the property itself. A Non-Domestic Energy Assessor has to be qualified for the particular property Level that they are assessing.

The Building Regulations, Part L in Eng & Wales and Part F in Northern Ireland, aim to ensure minimum standards are adhered to wherever buildings are constructed. The prescribed method for demonstrating that minimum standards have been achieved with regards to the energy efficiency requirements is to perform a (SBEM) calculation on the property.

The inspection required in order to provide a commercial EPC is very thorough and the time taken to compile the report could be anything from a day for a small lock-up shop, to over a week for larger commercial premises. It includes:

  • Inspection of the buildings plans
  • Analysis of the buildings design
  • Analysis of the buildings fabric and what the building is being used for
  • Analysis of the buildings structure and calculations on insulation measures that are in place
  • Analysis of Lighting, Heating and Air Conditioning Systems
  • Production of reports, graphs and diagnostics
Recommendation Reports

Along with your commercial EPC a recommendation report is also provided. This report will suggest how to increase the energy efficiency of your property with a view to reducing running costs and the impact on the environment.

New Buildings – Predicted Energy Assessments (PEAs)

All new buildings should have an ‘as designed’ energy assessment undertaken before actual commencement of building takes place. These energy assessments produce a Predicted Energy Assessment (PEA) report.

Such a report can be used by the client, architect and builder to aid discussion about improving energy efficiency and eliminating potential problems. For ‘new builds’ it is extremely important to understand the issues of commercial EPC compliance at the design stage. Once the building has been completed we will undertake a final survey and produce an EPC.

Public Buildings – Display Energy Certificates (DECs)

It is now a requirement by law for all publicly administered buildings with a floor area over 250 m2 to have on public display a Display Energy Certificates (DEC). These certificates are similar to EPCs but are calculated in a different way and show information about a buildings past energy comsumption.

Extensions – Consequential Improvements

An EPC applies to the overall building, hence adding an extension or changing services does not neccessarily require a seperate EPC however you may need to have an energy assessment to demonstrate compliance with the Building Regulations. This type of assessments is often referred to as a consequential improvement.

Whether you run a small retail unit, a chain of factory units or a large complex office block Gemstone Energy Management are well-placed to ensure that you are compliant with the new laws, and can help plan how to accurately and efficiently manage your commercial property.

Meet our Experts

Matthew Kerrison

Trainee building and energy surveyor. 2:1 History BA (Hons)

Joined Gemstone Building Surveyors in Feb 2016.

I would like to think I bring a willingness to learn new skills to the Gemstone team and an eagerness to help out where needed across a variety of tasks.

In my spare time I enjoy reading a varied range of fiction and none fiction, especially anything to do with history and The American West. I also love woodworking, gardening and general pottering about at home.